In Pursuit of Quota
In Pursuit of Quota

Episode · 1 year ago

Tell Me Your Dreams - David Mcbee

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Why do you work? Where do you want to go? David Mcbee went from pursuing his dream of being the next Tom Cruise to selling others their wildest dreams. Then, he took his first job in sales. Rising to the top of field, David now host webinars monthly that attended by thousands of sales reps.

Welcome to in Pursuit of quota podcast where great sales people get their superpowers. If you are looking to add more superpowers, check out pitch wise nyc dot com and join the sales. Speak easy to connect with other sales leaders and founders Like Yourself Way are a new podcast, so be sure to hit like and subscribe so that you don't miss any of Season one. David McBee is a lot of things. Actor, author, trainer and sales person. He currently trains thousands of sales people with his monthly webinar and learning platform. So how did an aspiring actor turned into a sales person with superpowers? Donny Die. Our host listens to his story. And yes, those are birds from David's backyard that you were hearing. What I want to do is go all the way back to the beginning. And when you were growing up, were there any signs early on that you might have a bright future in sales? You know, there was this. There was this one time I never thought of myself as a salesperson, and even as this story I'm about to tell you happened, I didn't think of it like that until later I looked back at it, but there was this time my father was a butternut bread man. So he delivered bread and buns and things like that to grocery stores. And every once a while he would trade with some of the other guys. And he came home with a case of 100 grand bars one day. Okay? And so I threw a bunch of them into a duffel bag and took him to school and told him for 50 cents apiece. And I was making $20 a day at, you know, 10 years old in the eighties. So I was I was loving that. I guess that was my very first sales job, if you will. And then as that's funny. So then were there other? Were there other things that he would come home with? Did you try to flip or was it mostly just that just 100 was the under Barzani. I kind of got in trouble for that cause selling items. One. You're gonna loud, right. Most of my teachers,...

...you know, looked the other way. They knew I was a good kid. Meanwhile, my mother was like, You can't break the rules. What's next drugs E. And then in terms of in terms of, like, just general interest that you had in school in high school. What? Well, what kind of things did you do to kind of keep yourself busy outside or or was it just primarily this 100 grand? No, no, I was I was in marching band, and, um, I was in theater. I was okay. I thought it was gonna be Tom Cruise when I was that age. Okay? And then it wasn't so. There wasn't a lot of so the stereotype of the most people get into sales or the quarterback for the athletes. I'm curious about this. Do you consider yourself competitive or where you competitive back then? I never did sports. Really? But that was just because I was a uncoordinated nerd, But yeah, I guess I'm definitely competitive. Did you see any? So the two things that must get associated with sales people is kind of this general competitiveness. And this general persuasiveness. So do you think you were kind of tapping into some sort of unrealized persuasiveness when you were when you were pursuing theater stuff, or was that I honestly love that question. Donnie, I think that it's just part of my nature to be persuasive in college. How did do you feel like you evolved in college in general versus what you were like in high school meeting? Did you Did you try different things that you feel like you developed some skill sets that would have would have allowed you to b'more persuasive or competitive or any of those things Honestly think, Donny, that until after college I went to college to be an actor, right? And after college, when I realized I don't want to be an actor, that's really the first time I embraced sales. That's when I, you know, decided that I was gonna be that competitive negotiator, that I was gonna win those competitions. But throughout college, all I wanted to do was play act like an idiot. Eso the, uh, makes sense. So the in your mind...

...that you work hard in college where you're hardworking kind of college guy or what was your Yeah, I didn't live on campus. I couldn't afford to. So I lived at home, which was in Blue Springs, and I drove a half hour every day to school, and I would go to classes all day, and then we have play practice. I don't I was pretty much at school till 10 11 o'clock at night. Then I turn around and drive home and do it again the next day. I absolutely worked hard in college. So you go through school, you get, you get, you get you want to become an actor. At what point did you realize that that wasn't the path for you? That that maybe maybe the next Tom Cruise wasn't within you, so to speak, E, Didn't you know I didn't ever have dreams of running off to L. A or New York Thio Make it big, you know, because I'm really, really close with my family. And I I thought, Well, I could make a living as an actor here in Kansas City. There's theater. There's they film commercials, some movies, Right, Um, but the first couple of jobs that I got made me realize just how broke I was going to be if I continued on that path. Um, you know, I got a job in technical theater making $60 a week, and then I got a job. Believe it or not, as E or in Winnie the Pooh on, of course, didn't pay a fortune, right? It's Children's theater. And every professional actor that I knew in Kansas City also had another job. You know, they were attempt or ah, waiter or bartender, and I just didn't wanna have a job that I hated so that I could be an actor. So in my mind it was like You either have to go to New York and L. A and fully commit or find another path, and I just decided to find another path. And then what was the what was the first step you made in that different path? You're gonna laugh, But are you familiar with network marketing? Know what is network marketing? So, network marketing. Classically, ITT's the Amway's, the Mary Kaye's, It's you buy and distribute a product of some kind, but you really make money by recruiting...

...other people to also be distributors. And so I found myself in that world first in Amway and then another one called the Tax People and then one called travel wise. So I went back and forth. Um, and really, what I sold was the dream, the dream of being an entrepreneur, the dream of being wealthy and that was that was a lot of fun, actually. I had a lot of fun in network marketing, so I'd love to kind of here what was What was a typical dream that someone that you were that you were actualizing for a person? Like what? What kind of things did you typically sell as their quote unquote dri? Well, that's kind of my first introduction to a needs analysis, right? You would find out what a person wanted. Was it a new car? Was it a big house? Was it vacations? Was it financial freedom, you know, and that's really what you would focus on. That's how I was recruited, right? And you would see people in the organization living those dreams. There was always someone who had come along before you, who was financially successful, and they would happily tell you that they did it by recruiting three people who recruited three people who recruited three people. And then all of a sudden you had 9000 people in your pyramid and your organization. It's officially called a down line, and I actually got to that point at one point, Donny, where I was getting a $900 check in the mail two or three times a week. Wow. Historically, I think I think the stereotypes of that is that your kind of reaching out to friends and family and people that, you know, like, personally, that terrifies me To think I would be trying to sell something to somebody. Like calling, calling Uncle Joe, telling him how he's gonna get finally get that boat. So did you find that difficult or kinda odd at first, or were you pretty, like, kind of natural to it? Well, I think I was so young and naive. I just thought everyone was going to do this. It seems so simple to me, right? All you gotta...

...do is buy $100 with the soap for yourself and get three or four or five other people to do that. And then they just have to do that. It seems so simple. So I do remember sharing the plan. That's what we called it with my father. And he was just like, no, and I was like, How can you not do this? You know, three people just and he was just like, No, I've seen this before. This is and that was kind of my moment that realized that where I realized e couldn't just lean on friends and family. I had to go outside my circle. That's when I learned to prospect. Really? So how how what would that look like? I mean, this is before the Internet, before all that kind of stuff, I presume, right, Every single person you met was a prospect on me, so I used this thing called this acronym called Form. Every time I met someone I would ask them about f their family owe their occupation are what they did for recreation and m how they made money. And those would lead to conversations that usually, you know, uncovered that they were unhappy at their job, that they weren't making enough money. And then that would give me the end to try and recruit them. So and then where would you typically meet? These folks, you know, you'd meet, uh, if it was one on one, you meet at a coffee house or whatever, but more often than not, you would invite someone thio the Marriott on Thursday night when one of those big shots was gonna stand up in front of a room and talk about you know, how it all worked. And that was very that was very convincing to a lot of people because they'd be in a room with 30 or 40 other people. All of them staring at this white board with all these circles on it on day were like, This looks so good. Do you think this looks good? Yes, this looks good. Well, this is a no brainer, and they'd sign up on the spot, and eventually I became that person in front of the room drawing circles. And so what was that like, What was the talk to me about the first time that you actually got to be the queen of the quote unquote goat of the network marketing world? But, well, there's, I mean, it's just as you might imagine it, Donnie, someone steps up out of the room and says, David McKee's here. He's going to show you how toe, you know, achieve your dreams and I'd stand up...

...and I talk about how all you had to do was by you know, this products for yourself and then convince other people to do it. And I do a little math on the board. Did you feel like you were selling in that moment? Oh, sure, sure. You're selling a concept. You're selling the dream. That's what we called it. So what led you to no longer sell the dream? Bankruptcy. Thank you. Eh? So you went from taking your watch off in front of rooms and telling him it cost more than their car Thio bankruptcy. That Z Okay, One of the companies I worked with was called the Tax People. And ask People's main product was a system that would teach people with home businesses how to cut back on their taxes, how to save money, right? You know, turning their home into a home office, things like that. And, uh and that's where I had just tons of success. But the I r. S was not a big fan of that program, so they shut down the company. My wife had just retired from her job. Here we are, 2025 26 years old. We're financially free. Like I said, $900 checks just rolling in. I think she was pregnant at the time and all of a sudden Oliver Income just stopped. So she went out and she got a job at David's Bridal and she found me a job selling Yellow Pages advertising. Donny. That's when I grew up, right? That's when I stopped seeing the circles and and dreaming of the of the stars and just figured I needed a real job to pay the bills and support my son. Really excited to start the elevates job? No, no, I had just come from a world where I could sleep in a Zlata A so long as I wanted. People looked up to me and, you know, came to hear me speak in front of the room and, you know, and now I was sitting in a cubicle wearing a button up shirt and slacks because someone, because someone told you Thio, now, because it's your...

...preference of wearing. And so the other thing that came with moving into into this end of the yellow page world was training, right? Like so someone. Actually, you went through training and actually understood out of cell. How was, in your view, what was the major differences? Or what was your thoughts about being trained as a salesperson versus kind of doing what you have done in the past. Well, to this day, I lean on the lesson that I learned at that training. I went thio Dallas for two, maybe three weeks toe learn how to sell yellow pages. And the big lesson that I walked away with was, um, find the gap and are set another way. You can't sell a product or service to someone until you discovered that it fills a need that they have. So what I discovered was instead of focusing on benefits and features and talking about why a product is so wonderful, I needed to find out what the problem was or the need was with my prospect that I could fill with, uh, with my product that was huge. Do you feel like most salespeople that you interact with today and even talk to Do they understand that principle, or is that something that that typically has to be? E. I think most sales professionals today are taught to do a customer needs analysis, so yeah, mostly they're trying to find a need. Um, there's not as much time for relationship building and questions like that. So I think that often we settle on a generic need like, Oh, this business owner wants to grow his business by 20%. Instead of realizing that the reason the business owner wants to grow his business by 20% is so that he can afford to send his daughter to Harvard, right? You know, it's the need behind the need, and I don't think today that getting to that is as easy as it might have been back then. But that really is a core tenet of kind of...

...how you found success is a seller, someone to change it up a little bit. So what I think of you, David, one of things that always comes to mind is this idea of You've always been very passionate about sales, but you've also been very passionate about your home. Life is well, so there's an intrinsic like the work Life balance is a term that's far overused, but I'm curious to hear like, do you feel like sales has allowed you to have a better family life than you would otherwise? Or is it something that if you have taken, um, or, like quote unquote, not traditional but more like stated role of being a doctor or being a lawyer or any of those other things. Like what is What's your thought on that, like as a sales enabled you to have a closer relationship or has it been almost a barrier at times? You know, I I mentioned earlier that my dad was a butternut bread. Me and you leave early in the morning and he'd come home around four o'clock and, you know, he was in a position where he could just shut off work. You have to think about it. Talk about it. The bread was gonna be there tomorrow. Red wasn't emailing him or calling him and annoying him, right? I think in sales, you do carry this burden with you at all times where you're thinking about your quota, right? In fact, my wife would tease, you know, she knew when I was struggling with quota or if it was near the end of a Yellow Pages directory. Whatever. And she say, Oh, is it that time of the month for you? And I'm, like, showed up. You know, eso I do think sales actually made it a little harder to focus on family when I wasn't at work. I feel like I brought a lot of that home with me. What do you think makes a great seller passion for their product or a belief that their product will help the person that they're talking to in some way? Do you feel your ability to sell comes from nature or training? Oh, the old nature versus nurture question, huh? Well, based on the conversation, I had a few earlier about the candy bars. You could definitely argue that part of his...

...nature. My grandfather was a salesman by the way. He sold Harry Truman most of his cars after he retired from the presidency s. Oh, I think I have some of it innately, but I definitely became way better at it after going to Dallas and being trained. When are you the saddest thing? Your sales role? The first thing that came to my head was when I'm not at quota when I'm not selling when I'm not making money. But the reality is, I think when I pitch something that I truly believe in, my heart will fill The gap for my prospect will help them in some way will make their lives better. And they still say no that Oh, I just feel like I've I've lost the game at that point. It's like the opposite right when they said no and it really would have been good for them. That's hard. I hate that. Yeah, I think that Zraly the sign of something that you really believe the problem. I believe in the product, right? It's gonna go. Yeah, I know. I could see where that's gonna help. What's the best piece of advice you ever got as a salesperson? I think it goes back to that whole idea of finding the gap, right? Stop talking about your product. Stop talking about benefits and features and instead figure out why the person you're selling to should buy what you're selling. What's the worst piece of advice you ever got is a sales person. If you're not lying, you're not selling. Yeah, I think that Z what we call an inside joke in the sales business, but it's definitely, uh yeah, I would not encourage that s Oh, let's see if you could talk to your 18 year old self. What would you say to them about the career that they will choose. Well, before I answer that, can I tell him to use Rogaine or something before it's all too late? You keep him for this thing? There's a couple things in that time travel that I'd like to dio. I think that I would say to my 18 year old self, You know, when you've got...

...this whole be an actor thing out of your system, you're gonna be OK, right? You're gonna find a career that will give you your dream car, your dream home. You know, I'm not wealthy by any means. Well, to some people, I would be right. But I think that compared to Tom Cruise, I'm broke. But generally speaking, I would say it's gonna be okay. You're gonna make a nice living. You're gonna You're gonna do fine. Thanks for joining us. If you would like to speak to Donnie directly, his email is Donnie at quota nyc dot com. That's d o N N y at q u o t a n y c dot com. Also be sure to check out pitch wise nyc dot com for exclusive content and to join the speakeasy till next time. Be well and hit quota.

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